SIGNUP FOR E-MAIL UPDATES

Online discrimination, mapping poverty, and more...

A nonprofit in Queens taught a diverse group of people to write iPhone apps—bringing women, underrepresented minorities and immigrants into the tech field, and helping their incomes jump more than $55K. (Vox)

Goodbye net neutrality, hello net discrimination: The FCC’s proposed new rule “threatens to make the Internet just like everything else in American society: unequal in a way that deeply threatens our long-term prosperity.” Plus: How to take action to protect net neutrality. (The New Yorker, The Nation)

How big data could render landmark civil rights and anti-discrimination laws obsolete. (The America Prospect)

An impassioned dissent that argues against those who would “wish away” racial inequality. (Washington Post)

“It’s not that India’s poor don’t know how to use a toilet, or that they should be using it, it’s that they literally can’t.” (Hazlitt)

+

McDowell County, the poorest in West Virginia, is “a sobering reminder of how much remains broken, in drearily familiar ways and utterly unexpected ones” 50 years after the War on Poverty. Plus, an interactive map of poverty in America. (The New York Times)

How to create common ground between the labor and climate movements. (The Nation)

The important history left out of a high-profile new book on the marriage equality movement. (Slate)

Why income inequality in the fast food industry has serious repercussions for the economy as a whole. (Demos)

How Brown v. Board of education changed—and didn't change—American education. (The Atlantic)